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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be in jordan. -- the day that osama bin laden was killed, i happened to be in jordan i saw students out there chanting "usa!" these are young people who were children at the time of the 9/11 attack, most of whom were probably too young to remember those attacks directly as conscious beings. they know it as a part of history. and i don't think that, if we want to be a nation founded on justice, a nation founded on laws, that assassination is a way to do that. this was a huge crime against humanity, what happened on september 11. bringing the perpetrators to justice is a noble goal, a fascinating, the of the perpetrator who is not physically there, but who was inspiring the action is not such a noble thing in my mind. jordanians and palestinians in jordan, many of whom have suffered far more at the hands al qaeda-tech militants even then we have, they were not thrilled at the idea that there was an assassination of this kind because they have seen the consequences of assassination. it is not a question of should somebody be arrested, brought to trial, the be imprisoned for life. absolutel
one is still called today. east jerusalem was then part of jordan, and it contained the jews' holiest sites, including their ancient temple, destroyed by the romans. once the temple was destroyed, all that remained was the western wall. this place is important for the jewish people worldwide. ross: this is what people prayed to ever since the second temple was destroyed, ever since the jewish people were dispersed. narrator: but because they were in jordanian east jerusalem, the site was off limits to jews until 1967. that year, israel defeated threatening arab armies in the six-day war and gained control over more territory. from syria they took the golan heights. from egypt they captured the sinai peninsula and the gaza strip. from jordan they occupied the west bank of the jordan river, including the rest of jerusalem. ross: after the six-day war, after the victory in '67, with the unification of jerusalem, one of the very first things done by a labor-led government was to make it clear that jerusalem would never be divided again. narrator: israel had moved its capital to jerusalem
between israel and jordan. does that come to play with something you said. >> another excellent question. three home run questions from three freshmen. [laughter] the united states is very 0 supportive of efforts in the middle east to try to work out some of the challenges to the production and exporting of energy. and i think you know from having been in israel, israel has made some significant finds of natural gas off the coastline, and there's also the potential for such new energy sources off of cypress, off of lebanon, and we have been urging diplomatically that everybody work out their boundaries, that gets me back to one of the points i was making because there's often overlapping claimant -- -- claims and unless they're resolved stand in the way of the commercial exemployeation of whatever the reserves night be. it's in everyone's interest to try to make sure. everybody know where the boundaries are and people are able to let contracts that will be legally recognized in order to see what potential is available. similarly with respect to the pipeline, as you know, the pipeline fro
border with jordan to help bolster that country's military readiness. there is a late development that could have major ramifications. correspondent leland vittert has specifics from jerusalem. hello. >> just in the past few hours, bret, the turkish military intercepted a syrian airliner flying from russia. turkish foreign minister says they have intelligence that the plane is carrying non-civilian cargo. comes and we're learning the u.s. now has military boots on the ground near the syrian border. >> with increasing fears over the security of syrian chemical weapons, stock piles, approximately 150 u.s. special operations troops flown to jordan to build headquarters and begin contingency planning to keep weapons of mass destruction from being used against civilian polllations or falling in the hands of militants. the u.s. defense secretary would not rule in or out direct military action. >> we make the relationship between the united states and jordan a strong one. so that we can deal with all of the possible consequences of what is happening in syria. >> that could include syrian
. benjamin netanyahu says he has every right to build in this area. in jordan and explosion has killed a least 10 people and injured dozens more. this was the old city center of damascus. and it is also a christian minority section. there were talks with u.n. peace talks about the civil war. >> coming up on kron 4 news weekend much more news when we come back . among the 49ers are off. however that big game for the giants. the jaguars are planning at the coliseum. cal was defeated last night. curry was pre-injured on friday night. this was part of the same ankle that kept him out of the 40 games last year. this injury continues. they are hoping that he is going to be able to play this season. he also to renter re-enter the season bu the game--but he was held up as a precaution. the official season for their team starts october 31st. >> the diamondbacks picked up some of center fielder choice packs. they say that this does not necessarily mean that the current center fielder coco crisp is an series. >> louisville slugger is continuing a 100 your tradition. they have made that for the wo
him is that he was the principal, secret negotiator of the israel/jordan peace treaty, and it's easy to forget that, that role, but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the region is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today, i'm told the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty, will abide by the peace treaty with israel, but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it, and so have we, for many years. as haleh said, we watch developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are faring in the arab awakening. last month a former deputy secretary of state and ambassador tom pickering and other senior national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of middle east experience presented a rep
are options we would look at and could consider. >> mayor jean quan says she doesn't want to see chief jordan's authority undermined and is hopeful the feds won't take control of the department. but she's coming up with options just in case, including bringing in what she calls a full-time compliance monitor. >> we really need someone here who can immediately say okay, we don't like the way how you're doing this training on use of force or we don't think that it's implemented correctly, et cetera. >> reporter: talk of receivership makes the head of the police union nervous but he says something needs to change. >> 20% increase in violent crime, we hit 100 murders already with 2 1/2 months left to go. the lowest level of police officers on the force in over a decade. that's not a good thing. >> reporter: the mayor says she would not want that compliance monitor to have the authority to hire or fire, but she would like that person to be here in oakland full time. of course, this is all left to a federal judge to decide, a hearing on the matter is scheduled for december 13. reporting live in oak
of refugees fleeing to jordan, lebanon, turkey, iraq. she hottest elements are coming in across the border -- jihadist elements are coming in across the border. >> do you think the only solution is for assad to go? >> there is no doubt that you cannot kill that many people and stay in power, but that is not a solution. that is may be part of the solution. what happens when he goes? we need to make sure that the security forces -- that they do not get into a chaotic collapse. >> do you think, with hindsight, when you took up the role for syria, you should have been less even-handed from the beginning and should have said right from the get go, "bashar al assad, you have to leave"? >>no, that is not a negotiator. i was brought in to try to bring the parties to the table. even the big powers have not been able to do that. for the mediator to walk in and think you can do that, you would be crazy. >> kofi annan, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> it was called africa the mostand was one of bizarre and successful music events of the summer. o e -- over 80 african and western musicians traveli
at the beginning of this yerar upon the initiative of jordan. we have also encouraged the expressed desires of several countries to contribute to efforts to break the cycle of deadlock. we have also undertaken an initiative to have favorable conditions. unfortunately, the result of all of these initiatives has been very negative. mr. president, ladies and gentlemen, there can only be one meeting of debt is a of -- meainaning of the government actions in our homeland. a permanent status agreement to end the conflict and achieve peace. when understanding leads to one conclusion. the isreali accepts the two state solution. the two state solution, namely the state of palestinian coexist with the state of israel, represents the spirit of this for a compromise in this declaration of principles signed 19 years ago. it is a compromise in which the palestinian people accepted to establish their state and only 22% of the territory of historic palestine. there is an intensification of isreali measures in the emptying the course -- emptying the oslo accord of their meaning. they're making it the extrem
the border with syria and jordan. washington has been insisting that we are not going to directly intervene. dinesh d'souza is here to tell us what is going on in obama's america and wth our troops abroad. the supreme court takes up the question of the future of affirmative action. shannon bream was there for the argument and she will be next with the lou: the obama justice department rejecting claims that the south carolina law that requires voters to show photo id discriminate against minorities, since there is four wks remain to election day. that law will not be allowed to go into effect until, however, next year. arguments in the supreme court case today could change affirmative action poicies. shannon bream has the report. >> what we want? diversity. >> tay, the supreme court was taxed witheciding just how far colleges and universities can go, if at all, when it cmes to factoring rates intoheir admissions decision. abigail fisher said that she didn't get into the university of texas at austin, claiming that let's are qualified minorities were given preference over her simply because s
egypt and jordan. we seek to forge peace with the palestinians. president abbas just spoke here. we will not solve our conflicts with libel speeches at the u.n. we have to sit together and negotiate together and reach a mutual compromise in which a palestinian state recognizes the one and only jewish state. [applause] israel wants to see middle east progress and peace. we want to see the three great legions that sprang forth from -- judaism, christianity, and is -- judaism, christianity, and is
and support of al assad and the tensions in the region are going up. look at syria, turkey, jordan, syria -- >> bill: sure. it's cauldron over there. >> absolutely. >> bill: i wanted to get your opinion on what you would have done had you been president. finally, were you surprised that president obama was so flat in the debate? he wasn't the guy that debated you four years ago. >> well, i think that there is a fundamental change here, bill, and that was in 2008, he didn't have a record to defend. and he's been living in a four-year bubble surrounded by an adoring media. this is the first time that he has really had to respond and he couldn't because he's having to defend a record which is indefensible. and i guess the second thing is that what is probably most impactful about this than anything else is that obama has been in a campaign spent hundreds of millions of dollars, particularly if swing states portraying mitt romney as some kind of out of touch richie rich, you know, bank accounts in the cayman islands guy and he came across as a sensible, reasonable, centrist man who wants to u
questions posed by the michael jordan moderator. you don't want to be belittling our demeaning to the person who asked the question. >> they sent out a big memo this morning going through all of these statements, word by word that romney had made in the first debates, followed by long answers that the president should have given. i mean, it was 2800 words a long memo they went through. >> greta: i got that long memo. i thought oh, brother i've got enough to do today. >> they're in would have, could have, should have mode. it's basically here's what i should have said. i expect that's what the president will say tomorrow night. >> the certainly the element of do-overs in any of the attacks. if big bird gets mentioned again, he'll know exactly what to say this time. i think what makes this unpredictable, the questions will be totally 50sly different. neither candidate wants to retread the ground they went over two weeks ago. they need new areas of attack. >> greta: i'm interested to hearing the libya question, if there is one i'm interested in the answer. panel, thank you. >> thank you. >> gre
and egypt and also the joint projects of energy resources in the middle east between israel and jordan and how that comes to play with everything you said. >> 3 home-run questions from three freshmen. [laughter] the united states is very supportive of efforts in the middle east to try to work out some of the challenges to the production and exporting of energy. and i think you know from having been in his real that israel has made some significant finds of natural gas off its coastline. potential forhe such new energy sources of cyprus, off the lead the non -- off of lebanon and we have been working diplomatically that everyone work out their boundaries. that is one of the points i was making. there's often overlapping claims and those overlapping claims, unless they are resolved, stand in the way of the commercial exploitation of what ever the reserves might be. so it is in everyone's interest to try to make sure that everybody knows where the boundaries are and people are then able to let contracts that legally recognized to see what potential is available. similarly, with respect to
with valuable allies like israel, and major countries like jordan who made great sacrifices to stay with the united states in many important areas. neil: this whole fiscal cliff thing, you told me last time we were here, in kentucky. maybe that better part of valor to extend rate, cuts, sort it out whether barack obama is elected or mitt romney. i think i got the gest of that. is it your sense something like that will pan out? >> i little different, the gang of 8, 4 democrats, 4 republicans, we feel we have to step forward, agrre on how much deficit will be cut, and 4 trillion is the right target from my point of view. neil: the president said that tax hikes o on the rich are not included it is not happening. >> i agree, we have to find the way to buy the time necessary to putting it that 4 trillion-dollar dial there, needs to be a down payment to show we're sincere. neil: thank you very much. we can't keep meet could like this. >> i think this shaf last debat. neil: we have a lot more coming up in the prespin room, you can see many in the debate hall this is busy for a before debat
ties with the sunni alignment of the sunni gulf states, egypt and jordan and the shia group of iran's syria and hezbollah was not easy especially as tension rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. when you look initially at russian concerns in the arab spring, it can spread to russia was efforts on the same problems as the arab states, autocratic government, widespread corruption and rising prices and indeed democracy demonstrators were shouting the revolutionary train stopped at the station in cairo, next stop moscow. the second concern, islam is my takeover and in a ending chaos and further inspire the islamists and north caucasus and increasingly and khe sanh as well. number three is oil and gas investments in the middle east could be jeopardized as well as the business and arms sales deals and number four when libya occurred, the russians i think that the major lesson purgative stained on the u.n. security council vote in the no-fly zone in bolivia thereby supporting the arab consensus and continuing the widened russian p
such as saudi arabia, uae and jordan, and in 2008 he added libya to the expanding arc of activity. putin's goals were fourfold. number one, demonstrate russia was again a major power in the middle east and the world. number two, gain -- for projects while selling sophisticated products like nuclear reactors and railway systems. number three, as the cost and difficulty of extracting russian oil and natural gas grew to gain joint ventures in oil and natural gas extraction with countries like saudi arabia, iran, uae, libya and iraq. and number four and certainly very important, to prevent the arab states from aiding the islamic resistance movements in the north caucuses that were beginning to spread through the rest of russia. but keeping good ties with the sunni alignment in egypt and jordan and the shia group of hezbollah was not easy, especially as tensions rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. now, when you look initially at russian concerns with the arab spring, a, it could spread to russia which suffered some of the same problems as
you, sir. >> may i ask we give mr. jordan his full five minutes? >> be honest -- >> i ask yuan mouse consent the member have 15 seconds. >> objection. mr. chairman, with all due respect. you just allowed mr. burton to go over by two minutes and you're giving mr. -- >> i'm sure it's going to balance tout time. >> we have gone over and i'm going to pull it back into five minutes. >> before we get to your part of the day we will get there. >> without objection, the ranking member is given equal time to ask a question, please. >> i want to go back to you ambassador. i think that was a very critical question. mr. norton talked about the five days. can you explain that to us that during that period, five days or whatever it was, not having the information contrary to what ms. rice may have said. i understand it was based on intelligence. but can you explain how that could happen to the public? in other words, were you all still gathering information, what was going on there, do you know? >> mr. comings, we were gathering information from the intelligence community. we wanted to know what w
for a reason. this fire can quickly spread to turkey to jordan, to iraq. it is very dangerous. >> rose: may i ask this question, turning to another issue that is of great concern to the world, which is the success of negotiations between your government and the p-5 plus 1. where are you and do you believe there will be some success? >> we are hopeful that this will happen. this is why we are participating in the talks, in the negotiations. if there is no hope for success, then why would we even participate. however, we think that with technical and legal negotiations, we will not achieve anything. because our nuclear issue is not, is not legal and is not technical. you know about it because we have discussed it several times. >> rose: you believe it's a political question. >> yes t is clear t is clear that it's political. >> are you building a nuclear weapon? >> a nuclear weapon? for what, for what purpose, why would we do that? >> what would we use it for? >> you did not deny you are building a nuclear weapon. >> how many times should i repeat this opinions please, repeat it. please tell me
was standing in terms of putting religion on the table. i made several interventions with jordan and italy. i believe that the conversation has begun. the first cut in going forward is doing what we are doing today and putting government, religion, and politics on the table. we are planting seeds for the future. i think we have made a lot of headway with strategic of dialogue. i would hope at some point, this panel and i could travel together so it is not just of a government. the government goes with congress. i think at some point in the future we might want to go together and begin to really show them a paradigm that has not been done before. we are on our way. >> for the invitation. [laughter] >> we have a lot of questions and the time is quickly marching on. i will ask you to run around a little bit. you might want to be on the center aisle so we can capture some of these questions before we leave at noon. >> i will make it really quick. one of the elements and i think is lacking in the discussion, we talk about the u.s. government and civil society. we do not talk much about the behavio
in the country. violent attacks on our embassy. what does it take? >> it is what i said, mr. jordan. there was not any actionable intelligence. as the director of national intelligence had said. >> are these guys professionals? these guys said they needed more help. >> if i could finish my statement, sir. >> all right, and then i want to go to these guys. >> there was no actionable intelligence available that indicated there was a plan or any indication of a massive attack of the nature and lethality. >> they were not good enough? >> there was a single rocket propelled grenade fired at the red cross. there was an attack on the british compound. we analyzed those things. i should also note, for example, the french and italians and the united nations lifted that same threats -- >> mr. nordstrom, do you think there were ever going to give you what you wanted? what would warrant them saying, these guys know what they're talking about? we are going to me to the request. -- to meet that request. >> thank you for asking that question. i had that conversation when i came back on leave for t
. >> it is spreading already. it is spreading to lebanon and jordan. >> the husband of violence. -- there has not been of violence in lebanon. at the same time, there is so many other places where you could have a fire began. -- which i think the russians are, here. >> i agree that russia is unlikely to help us in the united states. we have tried three times in the u.n.. cotton three vetoes in return. best case, maybe i was in china a few months ago. talking about, maybe they should concentrate on domestic problems, rather than having a domestic -- rather than having an aggressive domestic foreign policy. it is a possibility. i would give you my worst case, and it may be unfolding before our eyes. nato has guarantee turkey's borders. in case, what happened in just a week ago flares up -- more shelling. remember when i said in my presentation. he decides -- nonetheless, he might escalate the conflict the russians will not intervene. they said they -- their treaty with syria is not going to guarantee russian aid. we could see a nice war opening up with my then dragged into russia with the iranians. then
, if the time when jordan further and they are able to produce multiple weapons and a short time -- if the time line at short and a further and they are able to produce multiple weapons in a short time -- short of them testing in nuclear weapon, the further they get in the direction of having capabilities. [inaudible] >> you could maybe blame them now because they could price it in. thank you for the question, i want to get to a couple more. maybe you could both ask a question. >> i am just curious come in your analysis, how did you factor in the uncertainty about the effectiveness of a military strike? to a already indicated if there was a military strike, as i understand, having not read your report yet, that there would be a spike up in the short term of the price of oil. there seems to be almost an assumption that there would be closer to the issue of iranian military of nuclear capability when in fact there may not be closure. and i am just curious, was there a lot of analysis to that point about just this uncertainty about the effectiveness of any military strike? >> and we will take your
, it was the consolidation of israel's stranglehold on western air of israel the side of the jordan. his major asset being perfect american accent and his american football the cavalry. bv did not see himself only as an israeli leader. his self-perception is of a israeli-american political maestro with a single constituency, divided into two parts, one on the shores of the -- and one between the two shining sees of this hemisphere. i doubt if the vcs and the limits to his bipartisan plausibility in this country. why should he? considering how often and how easily he has outmaneuvered and outmatched first clinton and now obama. iran's nuclear program does pose a threat to israel's nuclear monopoly. it does pose a threat to israel's superpower, regional superpower status. what is this not to is pose an existential threat to israel. that it does not do and that military and intelligence establishments of israel know this. bp bebe's focus on iran's nuclear program is a monstrous red herring. he needs to divert attention from his top priority. what is his top priority? his top priority is his unfinished scient
work, and we are. and it's not only just america, but nato is now helping, jordan's helping train police, uae is helping train police. we've allocated $7 billion over the next months for reconstruction efforts. and we're making progress there. and our alliance is strong. and as i just told you, there's going to be a summit of the arab nations. japan will be hosting a summit. we're making progress. it is hard work. it is hard work to go from a tyranny to a democracy. it's hard work to go from a place where people get their hands cut off, or executed, to a place where people are free. but it's necessary work. and a free iraq is going to make this world a more peaceful place. >> ninety seconds, senator kerry. >> what i think troubles a lot of people in our country is that the president has just sort of described one kind of mistake. but what he has said is that, even knowing there were no weapons of mass destruction, even knowing there was no imminent threat, even knowing there was no connection with al qaida, he would still have done everything the same way. those are his words. now
a disaster his foreign policy has been. if you poll countries like egypt, jordan, you see the lack of respect for the u.s., the negative perception of the u.s. has gone up tremendously under this president and he thought he was going to sweet talk the muslim world into loving america. bill: well, last debate, debate number two, the question was asked, who was it who denied enhanced security in libya and why? that was a question from a voter in nassau county, new york. does the campaign think that the governor blew that answer? >> well, i think candy crowley jumping in there kind of knocked him off his pace and when the president deliberately lied about what happened in the rose garden i think he was being showed that the president would lie in front of 70 million people. so it knocked him off a little bit. i think now he is prepared for the fact he might get more dissembling from the president. he always knows he has to work a little bit against the moderator. this administration has turned a foreign policy failure, the disaster in libya, into a character issue. all of a sudden the american p
, unquote. morocco, algeria, jordan have not experienced the arab spring, the recent developments have shown some changes. the political institution in some of the countries are in the process of transition with more participation. it's best if ambitious public spending plan. we have same legal system and procedures are being performed to the aspiration of the people and their yearning for a good government and transparency. now, let me turn to the american policies during the arab spring. two initiatives, these initiatives i don't think were a coincidence, but anyway they came up at the same time in 2011 and the other 12011. august 10, 2011, president obama ordered a division board. the president made the prevention of atrocities the key focus of his administration's foreign policy. this initiative aimed at civilians and holding perpetrators of atrocities accountable. the focus of this initiative is the area and libya. the other initiative come in the second initiative is the open government or airship, which announced in september 2011 but exacerbated in italy. it was launched by governmen
or is it going to be like iraq, jordan, bolivia, you know, the question answers itself. so the conditional probability that china will avoid the middle-income front is much higher than 50, 60 in three quarters when. so the notion that china i just don't think is likely at least if it reaches 50, 55% of the u.s. standards of living. yes, there is aging. it's a problem, but i think my number, my projection of 6.5% takes into account aging and as i said, there are lots of things china can do to overcome because it is very hard to avoid this problem. i forgot to mention that american boosters and u.s. boosters and china deniers say japan had this bubble, japan slowed down, china is in the same situation. and i say that that is fundamentally a long and how much because when china -- when japan reached that state in the late 80's and early 90's, japan was at the standard of living close to that. so, the scope for catch up to japan had was over. china is about 25%, so china japan and now what she is just plain wrong so it is related to the aging plant, so the demography's on the way that, but equ
several interventions with jordan and italy, and suddenly the conversation has begun. and so i think the first step in terms of going forward is doing we are doing today and begin to really put religion in government on the table. so the conversation has begun. we are planting seeds for the future but i think we have made a lot of headway with strategic dialogue. but i would hope at some point this panel and i can travel together so it's not just a government, so we have government goes with congress to a state department might go with congress, but i think at some point in future we might want to go together, so sold -- civil society and government and showed him a paradigm that has not been done before. so we are on our way. >> did you get a good shot? [laughter] >> we have a lot of questions, and time is quickly marching on. i'm going to ask you to run around. you might want to be in the center isle so we can capture the last equation and try to answer them all before we leave at noon. spent i'm from the state department. one of the things, element i think some black in the discus
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)